Showing posts with label Koi. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Koi. Show all posts

2018-05-15

The Dos and Don’ts of KOI PONDS

English: koi pond under construction
Koi pond under construction (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
First, you must understand that Koi ponds are not just simply holes in the ground that you can keep fish in. For a Koi pond to work properly, and actually sustain fish, a number of different things must be considered when you begin planning it. A few simple rules will ensure that you do not end up with an expensive hole with dead fish.

First, unless you have a large amount of knowledge in outdoor landscaping, fish keeping, and construction, it may be a good idea to leave the pond building up to a professional. While some people think that building the pond yourself with save you money, this could not be further from the case. If your pond is not built properly the first time, you will end up spending a large amount of money on fixing the problems that come up. Not only that, if your pond is not properly setup, you may not even be able to keep fish alive.

Remember when you hire a professional, it is their job to give you what you want. They can give their knowledge when it comes to decision making, but ultimately, they will do whatever you want them too. Because of this, you cannot blame them if your pond fails to do to location, size, or other factors. However, beware of extremely cheap quotes as they may cut corners that could potentially cause you problems later. While quotes will come in different, there should not be a very dramatic difference between them.

Koi ponds are by no means, swimming pools or animal water troughs. This is the reason why so much care must be taken in planning and building your pond. It may cost more money then building a typical swimming pool, but the rewards are much greater. Be sure to keep all children and other none fish pets out of the pond, as they can cause problems. If your children swim in your pond, not only could they cause a chemical imbalance, but they could also cause major problems such as leaks. While it is typically ok to have other pets around your Koi pond, some pets may get the idea that is fun to mess with your filtration system or chase your Koi around.


Remember, the majority of Koi ponds are permanent once they are built. This means that you cannot decide in two or three weeks that you do not want you Koi pond in the front yard, that you would rather have it in the backyard. Carefully plan each and every aspect of your pond, because once it is built, there is little you can do to change it. Remember such things as size requirements and placement.

Finally, remember that maintaining a Koi pond can be a substantial amount of work. Make sure that you will have enough time to carry out the everyday needed maintenance, and remember that, like with any other pets, issues will arise that require extra special attention. Vet visits may be needed, or you may need to take some extra time out of your weekend to clear up an algae infection. Have a plan, and make sure that if you are going to be going away, make sure someone with enough knowledge to properly maintain your pond is available until you return.


2018-05-05

Choosing Plants For Your KOI WATER GARDEN

Common water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes)
Common water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes)
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
So you finally finished your water garden construction. You have finally come to the fun part of creating your water garden: picking the flowers and plants that will make your water garden a beautiful oasis.

Not only should you consider beauty when you are picking your plants, but you must also remember that plants provide another, more important value to your garden, biological life. Biological life helps maintain your pool by doing what they would do in nature.

Be sure to pay attention to your climate and area. Some plants can simply not survive in certain conditions, so it is wise to do your research beforehand. Talking with your local dealer will give you some idea of what plants you can and cannot have in your pond.

Lotus Plants

Undoubtedly, since your pond contains Koi, a tropical fish, you may want to keep with the theme and place Lotus plants in your pond. Pretty much everyone with a tropical water garden will want a Lotus plant because the beauty is simply unmatched by other flowers.

Lotus plants provide beautiful blooms and a smell that is unmatched. However, unless you live in an area that sustains temperatures higher then 65 degree Fahrenheit, you will need to have to have a place to house your Lotus plants during the colder months. A greenhouse setup specifically for water plants will work the best.

Lotus plants require soil and a large amount of sunlight. They should be planted in water about 2 to 3 feet deep during the warmer months, and indoors during the colder months.

Water Hyacinths

If you simply do not have the time to plant and maintain your water garden’s foliage, or you are somewhat lazy when it comes to gardening, you may want to consider adding Water Hyacinths. Water hyacinths have become very popular recently because of their simplicity. They do not require any type of soil or planting, you must simply throw them into the water. Only minimal time is needed to anchor them down so that they do not float all over the pond freely.

Water Hyacinths are not only pretty but are also very functional as well. These plants aid in the fight against both algae and blanket weeds.

One downside when having Water Hyacinths is the fact that they will take over your pond and yard if you allow them. Water hyacinths are very invasive and will spread if allowed. In extreme cases, it may even jump the fence and take over the neighbors yard as well. Once they have caused this kind of infestation, it is notoriously difficult to get rid of them.

Hidden But Functional Plants

Alternatively, you may want to consider investing in plants that are not necessarily seen. These plants live below the water line and provide many needed functions to your pond. Some help you battle algae, put oxygen back into the water, or feed your fish for you. 



You can find these plants in bundles at your local pet store or Koi dealer. The majority of underwater plants will not need additional support during the winter, so once you place them in the water, you may not think twice about them again. However, the benefits that you gain from having these types of plants make up for the fact that you are not able to actually see them.


2018-04-13

KOI Population Control

Koi fish. Loro Parque.
Koi fish. Loro Parque. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Population control is typically easy with the majority of domesticated pets. It is usually as simple as removing the possibility of conception until the time in which the opportunity has passed. Unfortunately, this is not the case with Koi. Koi, no matter whether you want them to or not, will spawn and lay eggs, and other Koi will fertilize them. It is natural, and there is little you can do. Since contraceptive methods are not available for fish, population control really comes down to removing the unwanted babies after they are already born.

As a newcomer to this hobby, you may simply disregard this information. For whatever reason, whether it is that you feel removing unwanted babies is cruel, or if you believe that the more fish the merrier, you will quickly realize that keeping all the babies that are born could be a potentially harmful situation to both your pond and the original parent fish.

Why Are The Babies Harmful?

What is so harmful about having more fish your originally started with? Well, a number of harmful situations can happen.

First, Koi can and will grow to us to three feet in length. Koi, unlike some other fish, will grow, no matter the size of their habitat. This will turn a beautiful pond in a wasteful, extremely overpopulated pond. Not only will to many fish cause damage to a smaller pond, but they will not be comfortable in their habitat.

When you originally set up your pond, surely you set the filtration system up for a specific amount of fish. Adding extra fish without adding more to your system will ultimately cause a surge in unwanted gases and chemicals in the water that is dangerous to your Koi.

Getting Rid Of The Babies

There are several ways of removing babies from your pond.

One way is to stop feeding your Koi the minute you realize that spawning has occurred. You should stop feeding you Koi for no less than three weeks. Do not worry about your Koi starving, as they will focus more on natural foods if you are not feeding them daily. This “natural” diet includes their young. Koi are not cannibalistic animals by any means, but they will eat their young when they are still eggs or if they are small and resemble insects. Once the baby Koi actually resemble real fish, and the adult fish recognize this, they will no longer see them as food, so it is important to start this process as soon as you notice spawning or babies.

While this is a process of nature, you may still find this method to be cruel or unusual. Another way of removing unwanted babies from your pond is to give them away.


First, check with your local pet store. Many pet stores have programs in which they will accept unwanted animals and give them good homes. Some may even pay a certain amount for each fish since they sell them but do not count on this. Local zoos may also have programs.

If you know of a local Koi society, you may let them know that you have unwanted babies. Alternatively, you can find a message board or group online and post messages there. Who knows, you may even start another person on a Koi keeping hobby.



2018-04-07

Purchasing The KOI For Your Pond

English: Koi in an outdoor pond. ไทย: ปลาคาร์ป...
Koi in an outdoor pond. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
The first Koi were produced by breeding Carp such as the Asian and German Carp. After years of selective breeding, various color mutations started showing up. The first colors were recorded as early as 1805. Today, there are literally thousands of color variations available. The most popular colors found are white, silver, yellow, orange, red, black, blue and green. Combined with the patterns available, the possibilities are almost endless. Each noticeable pattern and color have their own names, which are typically as unique as the color they are referring too. Favorite types vary by country and location.   

Koi are raised for purchase in countries like Japan, Singapore, Israel, and in the warmer American states such as Nevada and California. Koi can be purchased at most local pet stores. If they do not have stock on hand, typically they can be ordered. Ordering Koi has its advantage and disadvantages. You have more options when ordering Koi since you do not have to pick from the stock on hand, but the disadvantage lies in the fact that you will not be able to pick specific Koi. 

Your pond should be complete before you even look into buying your Koi. The size and amount of Koi you buy should be higher based on your pond. Be careful, overstocking will cause problems right away with your pond, potentially killing many of the Koi you purchase, causing you to lose time and money. Talk with your local dealer about your setup so that they can inform you on the amount of Koi in which you should have in your pond.

Most fish owners understand that most fish will only grow to the size of their enclosure. Koi, unlike other fish, will grow until they are the size of their specific type. You must be able to accommodate the amount of fish you purchase in the future.

Koi are none-aggressive fish. Koi do not have teeth so you will not get bit if you decide to attempt to feed your Koi out of your hand. This even allows you to get smaller children involved. Smaller children will be delighted by the beautiful colors and gentle nature of the Koi. 

Koi, like any other wild animal, will naturally be afraid of you in the beginning. Instincts tell them to be afraid of you, which is what keeps them alive in the wild. You must build up trust with your Koi, and this takes time and patience. 

Koi are omnivorous fish, which means they will eat both meat and plants. This means that their diets are very versatile. Koi will eat pretty much anything that you put in the pond with them, no matter if it is good for them or not. Since Koi do not have a sense of what is bad and good for them, as their owner you must control their diet.



Koi Have Personality

You would not believe that Koi actually have personalities similar to other animals. They are social, and can even be trained to eat directly from their owner's hands. The more time you spend with your Koi, the more you will notice each Koi individual characteristics and traits. 

Koi have been known to live for up to 200 years at a time, but generally, the average lifespan of a healthy Koi is about 30 years. So if you are looking for a long time pet companion, Koi may be a good choice.



2018-03-14

The Amazing ASAGI KOI: Types and Classifications

Oya Asagi 78cm
Photo   by KoiQuestion 
Koi fish come in a large variation around the world and are one of the most popular when it comes to fish collecting enthusiasts.

Originally, koi used to come in three basic colors: red, white and yellow, but with the passage of time and advancement in science that helped cross-breeding to take place, we have a huge variety of koi to choose from.

With variety comes a score of colors and designs, all in sub-classes. Whatever type of koi you choose for your pond, however, you can be sure that you will be making the pond aesthetically pleasing.

When we think of types of koi, probably the oldest type of koi that comes to mind is the Asagi koi. The Asagi is believed to be the original koi, its appearance dating back to as far back as 160 years. It is also now known that the Asagi is the result of a mutation of an earlier type called the Magoi (Black koi).

A variant of the species came into being from the Black Koi, having blue scales and a lighter shade of blue around the scales, making a net-like pattern. This new species was cross-bred with Kohaku to get Asagi koi.

This koi had red cheeks and fins and a blue dorsal area.
Usually, gray/blue scales on the back are a common feature of Asagi koi. Sometimes the scales can vary in color and turn from lighter to darker shades of blue, usually around the center of the dorsal area.

Usually, the pectoral fins and the gills of the Asagi koi are found to be bright red but the koi can turn really dark in cold water. It has even been observed to turn totally black!

There are several sub-classes of the Asagi koi which have been formulated according to the patterns they come with. The classification is as follows:

Konjo Asagi: This is the darkest colored Asagi koi that you will find anywhere and can sometimes be totally black.

Narumi Asagi: There was a town in Japan called Narumi, where this special type of cloth with patterns was produced. The Narumi Asagi is named after that town because of having a similar pattern to that cloth.
The Narumi is usually dark blue in the center with light blue or white edges of the scales.

Mizu Asagi: This is the most expensive Asagi koi and comes in a totally light blue color. The color of blue in this koi is the lightest to be found. The Mizu Asagi is also known as Akebi.

Asagi Sanke: This type of Asagi is one of the rarest and priceless Asagi in the world. It has a pearl white abdomen.

Taki Asagi: A pretty uncommon variety, the Taki Asagi has a red abdomen with a white streak across it. The basic Asagi pattern is present.

Shusui: Large mirror scales are the highlight of the Shushui. There are also lateral lines to the left or right of the dorsal line that make the Shushui instantly identifiable. The result of a cross-breed between Asagi and Doitsu.

Most, if not all, of these differences, are easy to spot when choosing the type of Asagi koi you want. Keep in mind though that the most valuable Asagi are the ones with a white abdomen and they are very, very rare.




2018-03-07

5 Steps To a Perfect KOI POND

wr-new ponds 005
Koi Pond - Photo by pondelegance 
Step 1- Setting Up The Perfect Environment

You perfect Koi pond starts with the actual pond itself. You have to create a pond that will not only be pleasing to the eye but will also adequately sustain Koi. Proper placement, size, and pond type are essential when building your pond.

When it comes to pond size, the bigger is always better. Koi have a habit of growing rather fast, so you have to consider pond size at the same time you are considering how many Koi you are going to put it in.

Unless you have a large amount of knowledge in outdoor landscaping, fish keeping, and construction, it may be a good idea to leave the pond building to a professional. While some people think that building the pond yourself with save you money, this could not be further from the case. If your pond is not built properly the first time, you will end up spending a large amount of money on fixing the problems that come up. Not only that, if your pond is not properly setup, you may not even be able to keep fish alive.

Remember when you hire a professional, it is their job to give you what you want. They can give their knowledge when it comes to decision making, but ultimately, they will do whatever you want them too. Because of this, you cannot blame them if your pond fails to do to location, size, or other factors. However, beware of extremely cheap quotes as they may cut corners that could potentially cause you problems later. While quotes will come in different, there should not be a very dramatic difference between them.

Step 2- Learning about Koi Keeping

Knowledge is power when it comes to Koi keeping. It is important to learn as much as you possibly can about the hobby before jumping in with both feet.

It is important to learn the information yourself rather than relying on other sources. People such as your product dealer and pond builder will have limited knowledge, but should not be trusted for a reliable source, as they are selling products and may be biased. Plus, once you are at home with your Koi, your product dealer or pond builder may not be available to help you in the event of a problem.

Step 3- Picking Out Koi

Once you have created the perfect environment, you will need to start looking into buying your fish. It is important to remember never to purchase too many Koi because they will grow rather large, and they breed almost yearly. Overpopulating your Koi pond will cause serious problems in the future.

Step 4- Preventing Common Koi Pond Problems

You can prevent certain types of Koi pond problems by following simple prevention steps.

Always quarantine new fish before introducing them to your current Koi population. Koi can have certain illnesses and viruses, such as KHV or Koi Herpes Virus, with little or no showing symptoms. By quarantining, you will greatly reduce the risk of exposing your population to potentially deadly situations.

Do water tests at least on a weekly basis. This will allow you to notice discrepancies in the test results long before your pond starts showing symptoms of stress. This will potentially save not only your pond but your fish as well.


Step 5- Feeding You Koi

Finally, feeding you Koi can be one of the most pleasing parts of having a perfect Koi pond.

You should check with your local pet store or Koi dealer when it comes to the amount and types of food that you should be feeding your fish. Feeding patterns change with season and temperature.

Koi can be fed treats such as fruit, veggies, bread, and store-bought treats.

Koi can literally be trained to eat directly from your hand. This takes time and patience, but will ultimately provide entertainment to you and your visitors.


2018-03-05

Koi Ponds During The Spring

Huge ass Koi
Koi Fish Pool - Photo by jeremyfoo 
Making sure your pond is ready for the coming seasons should not take you more than a weekend to complete, and will ensure that you have a successful water garden for the remainder of the year.

Your Koi pond will literally come to life at the first of springtime. The Living organisms in your pond have spent the previous winter in a proverbial hibernation, and are ready to come to life at the first signs of warm weather. This is the perfect time to begin maintenance on your pond before the fish, plants, and other pond life come back to life from their winter slumber. As the days begin to get warmer, your pond will start drastically changing. If you are not careful, you may miss this much-needed opportunity to perform maintenance. Generally, watch for temperatures around 50 degrees, as this is the perfect time.

The maintenance needed on your pond will largely depend on what happened during the previous winter. If the previous winter was hard, chances are you will need to perform more changes so it may be a good idea to start as soon as you start noticing the weather changes. However, some spring maintenance will have to be completed every year, no matter how harsh or how mild the previous winter was.

Water Quality

You may notice that the water in your pond is extremely clear when the seasons are changing from Winter to Spring. Do not let this fool you, as there are several factors that will actually cause problems once Summer comes if you do not remedy these issues ahead of time.

During the Fall and Winter months, the organic material such as leaves and plant material may have found its way into your pond. While the water seems clear at the time, the organic material placed a large number of nutrients into your pond, which will cause a surge of algae growth once spring arrives. If algae were not enough, a large amount of organic material in your pond will start to decompose and will reduce the oxygen content in your water.

Since your water is perfectly clear, it is the perfect time to clear all of this unwanted debris and slit from your pond. This can be completed a number of ways.

1) Hire a pond professional from your local dealer or pet store. They will have the equipment needed to vacuum the majority of the debris and slit out of your pond. While this is a more costly option, you will have the assurance that the majority of the problem causing material will be removed from your pond.  

2) If hiring a professional is not an option, you may want to consider using a fine mesh net to scoop up as much debris as possible. The only issue is most nets will only stir up the slit in your pond, rather than remove it.



Once you have removed unwanted debris, you must then test your water. Winter seems to cause the pH levels to change. At the start of Spring, your pH level should be an 8. This can be achieved by topping your pond off with treated tap water which is buffered to be slightly alkaline by your local water company.

Maintaining your Fish

Springtime is a very weak time for your fish, because they have not eaten for months, and have maybe lived on a low level of energy. This causes your Koi to be more susceptible to attacks from organisms such as bacteria, parasites, viruses, and fungi. This makes Spring the opportune time to take all preventative measures possible. Adding a large spectrum of treatment solutions will greatly reduce the amount of disease-causing pests and material. Once the temperature warms up, another dose of this treatment will ensure that your Koi will be well protected while they redevelop their immune systems. Once temperatures warm up, your Koi immune systems will be effective enough to protect themselves from a disease.  



2018-02-21

Asagi KOI

Asagi KOI




2018-01-03

SHIRO UTSURI - Koi Fish

SHIRO UTSURI - Koi Fish




2017-11-06

KOI FISH - A Beginner's Guide to the KOHAKU and the BEKKO

Murata Kohaku 50cm
Murata Kohaku
Photo by KoiQuestion
The Kohaku is the most highly cherished of the koi varieties; a good specimen will be very valuable and really stands out in the pond. It is described as a two colour, non-metallic koi, namely a white bodied Koi with a red (Hi) pattern on its back.

On a good specimen of Kohaku, the pattern should have clearly defined edges and the white should be a good unblemished colour, often described as snow white. The contrast between the two colours can be striking and this is why the Kohaku is so highly prized.

Although a Kohaku cannot have colour variations, it does have pattern varieties and these are generally known by the number, or placement, of Hi patches along the length of the body. Maruten (one circular Hi patch on the head and other Hi on the body), Nidan (two Hi patches along the back) and Inazuma (a single Hi patch along the back in the shape of a lightning strike) are some examples.

These are classic patterns, but other pattern formations are equally attractive, provided the pattern is well balanced. Normally, there should be no Hi on any of the fins of a Kohaku; they should be white at the body joint, changing to almost clear at the tips.

Otsuka Shiro Bekko 64cm
Otsuka Shiro Bekko
Photo by KoiQuestion
The body volume of a Nidan Kohaku is superb. The two patches are almost linked by the extended Hi on the right side. The white nose and caudal regions set this fish off wonderfully.

A beautiful Maruten Kohaku with a snow white skin and beautiful pectoral fins. Good body shape and the excellent pectoral fins make this a koi that will really stand out in your pond.

The Bekko is described as a fish with a black pattern on a coloured base. The black (Sumi) appears as balanced patches along the back of the koi, above the lateral line but not on the head. As in the Utsuri, the Bekko occurs in the base colour variations Shiro (white) Bekko, Aka (red) Bekko and Ki (yellow) Bekko.




2017-10-13

KOI Types - Your Guide To Koi Varieties

watching the monitor
Koi watching the monitor - Photo  by      The_Gut  (cc)
The word "Koi" means "carp" and originates from the Japanese language. The nomenclature indicates both the brightly colored Koi types and the dull gray fish. In Japan, the fish are called nishikigoi. The literal translation of nishikigoi is "brocaded carp". Koi in Japan means love or affection. Koi in Japan are symbols of love and affection. They have also become a popular subject for tattoos.

The common carp was grown for a food fish in China as far back at the fifth century. It has been concluded through scientific study that there is a minimum of two different subspecies of carp. One is from East Asia and another from Eurasia. Through continuous cross-breeding, the various varieties have evolved. Through the study of mitochondrial DNA, it has been learned that Koi are descendants of a variety of hybridized species.

The characteristics that distinguish the Koi are scalation, patterning, and coloration. The primary colors of Koi are black, white, yellow, red, blue and cream. The color combinations are unlimited. Breeders have taken it upon themselves to identify certain color combinations. The most popular of the Koi varieties are the Gasanke which consists of the Taisho Sanshoku, the Showa Sanshoku and the Kohaku varieties.

The crossbreeding has continued. As recently as the 1980's, Ghost Koi was developed in the UK. They are a cross between the wild Koi and the Ogon Koi. Their metallic scales are what distinguish them from other Koi. The dragon carp, which is also known as the Longfin Koi or the Butterfly Koi have long flowing fins which distinguish them from the other varieties. There are those breeders that do not consider the butterfly Koi and ghost Koi to be true Nishikigoi. The development of Koi types continue and the variety of choices increases. There are some who feel that the original Koi types are the only true Koi.

The Various Koi Types

Kohaku: This popular white Koi has red markings on the top of its body. the name Kohaku means red and white. This original Koi developed in the 19th century.

Taisho Sanshoku is also known as Taisho Sanke. In 1914, breeders introduced these types of Koi. They are similar to the Kohaku but have additional black markings. These small black markings are called Sumi. In the United States, they are frequently called Sanke. The kanji can be read as Sanshoku or sanke.

Showa Sanshoku is a black Koi. It has red and white markings. These types of Koi was first shown in 1927 during the Showa empire. The amount of shiroji, white markings, has increased over the years. In the United States, the name has been abbreviated to Showa.


Tancho Koi are distinguished by the single red patch that you see on the head of the Koi. The Koi in this category can be either Tancho Showa, Tancho Sanke or Tancho Goshiki. This Koi was named for the Japanese crane. The crane has a red spot on its head also.

Chagoi is tea-colored Koi. The color covers a wide spectrum of colors from a very pale olive drab green to a copper or bronze hue. Recently some have appeared in shades of orange. These particular Koi types are friendly, docile and very large. Keepers like to keep them in their pond with other Koi varieties as they feel they are a sign of good luck.

Asagi Koi is usually red, yellow or cream below the lateral lines of the fish and on its cheeks. The rest of the fish is a beautiful light blue. The name means pale greenish-blue in Japanese and also spring onion or indigo.

Utsurimono Koi are black and have either white, red or yellow marking. The original is the black and white markings, called the zebra color. The red and white are Hi Utsuri and Shiro Utsuri. Utsuri means to print. The black markings are very similar to ink markings. These types of Koi are genetically the same as Showa but without the white or red pigment.

Bekko is a yellow, white or red skinned Koi that has distinctive black markings. The name translates to "tortoise shell". The white, red and yellow Koi varieties are Shiro Bekko, Aka Bekko and Ki Bekko. Occasionally they are confused with Utsuri.

Shusui translates to "autumn green". The Shusui appeared in 1910. It is a cross between the German mirror carp and the Japanese Asagi. These particular Koi types have one line of large scales that extend from its head to its tail.




2017-08-15

Preventing Overpopulation - KOI Pond

Koi overpopulation is one of the hardest problems to deal with when it comes Koi ponds. Once you have too many fish in your pond, severe problems can occur, and potentially cause death among your fish.

There are a few ways to help prevent overpopulation. While you are never guaranteed that it will never happen to you, following a few simple steps will greatly reduce your chances.  

English: Koi pond with an extensive filtration...
Koi pond with an extensive filtration, build by Kent Wallace (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Do Not Overstock

A common problem new Koi pond owners run into is over stocking. When you first go to buy your Koi, it may come down to deciding between a number of Koi that is equally beautiful and playful in the spirit of saving your pond from over stocking. 

Talk with your Koi dealer or Pet Store professional about the specifics of your pond. You should tell them information about what type of filtration systems you have, what total size your pond is, and where you are planning on placing your pond. With this information, a professional will be able to adequately predict the right amount of Koi you can have in your pond successfully. Do not worry if this number seems small because the professional will also be taking into account the fact that Koi grow fast and get rather large.

Some people run into the problem of not being able to turn down Koi from others. When accepting fish from sources such as other Koi pond owners, take into account why they are giving you the fish. Chances are they are giving away fish because they are having issues with over population as well. Turning down fish does not mean that you are causing any damage to those fish, it simply means that their owner will have to find a different person to take the fish.


Once Overpopulation Has Occurred

In the event that overpopulation has already occurred in your pond,  there are several ways of removing babies from your pond. 

One way is to stop feeding your Koi the minute you realize that spawning has occurred. You should stop feeding your Koi for no less than three weeks. Do not worry about your Koi starving, as they will focus more on natural foods if you are not feeding them daily. This “natural” diet includes their young. Koi are not cannibalistic animals by any means, but they will eat their young when they are still eggs or if they are small and resemble insects. Once the baby Koi actually resemble real fish, and the adult fish recognize this, they will no longer see them as food, so it is important to start this process as soon as you notice spawning or babies.

While this is a process of nature, you may still find this method to be cruel or unusual. Another way of removing unwanted babies from your pond is to give them away.

First, check with your local pet store. Many pet stores have programs in which they will accept unwanted animals and give them good homes. Some may even pay a certain amount for each fish since they sell them but do not count of this. Local Zoos may also have programs.

If you know of a local Koi society, you may let them know that you have unwanted babies. Alternatively, you can find a message board or group online and post messages there. Who knows, you may even start another person on a Koi keeping hobby.


2017-07-26

The History Of BUTTERFLY KOI

Butterfly kois, also known as Longfin Kois or Dragon Carps are characterized by their slender bodies and long flowing fins and barbels. They are usually white, yellow or orange in color and come in most of the traditional Nishikigoi patterns such as the Aka Bekko, Kohaku, Sanke, Shiro Bekko, and Showa to name a few.

Butterfly Koi - Photo: Wikimedia


They were crossbred in the 1980's in an attempt to cultivate a hardier koi. Its specific koi lineage however, is debated. Some say butterly koi are a cross between the Indonesian Longfin river carp and traditional koi. Others, that the New York Company, the Blue Ridge Fish Hatchery developed these long-finned mutations under the auspices of Wyatt Lefever. He had apparently bought some grey/black carp variety from Indonesia by mistake but decided to see how the resulting fry would fair when bred with traditional Japanese koi. In seeing this new breed of long-finned and brightly colored fish Lefever's son, Randy is said to have remarked that they looked like butterflies- hence the name. Previous to this particular breed, most traditional koi varieties interbreeding efforts with other carps of less ornamental advantage, such as the goldfish, led to sterile hybrids.

Butterfly kois tend to come from Malaysia, Indonesia, Taiwan, Japan, China and Singapore. Outside of Asia, the UK and Israel are also known to breed them. Currently however, they do not hold their own show class in traditional Nishikigoi competitions due to their comparative degree of difference with other kois in appearance (finnage, dorsal, tail, shape and length) and cultivation. For instance, butterfly kois are known to grow faster than other kois, but never as large.

Indeed butterfly koi growth is one of its most impressive features. The older the fish the longer the fins and barbel whiskers. Given adequate water, they can grow up to 40 inches. The gene for the long-finned feature of koi is said to be the dominant one since 80% of fry resulting from interbreeding between long-finned butterflies and Japanese koi result in long-finned fish.
Despite their "outcasted" koi status, butterfly kois have nevertheless gained a following of their own due to the graceful effect of their "wings." It is thus commnon that traditional koi enthusiasts keep a specimen or two of these longfins in their pond.

While there are reports that as of June 2006, The Association of American Koi Clubs (AKCA) introduced separate standards for judging butterfly kois or longfins in US competitions, these standards were not as refined as their traditional Japanese koi counterparts. However, in January 2009, AKCA published an article in its official magazine KOI USA detailing more specific criteria based on finnage appearance and length combined with anatomical information necessary to say a longfin was a more acceptable one than another. It also introduced a classification system of different sets of longfins, criteria for jugding small vs. larger longfins and recommendations for measuring longfins in general.

Currently, if there is any agreement at all, it is to hold fast to the criteria that applies to all koi across the board. For instance, the lack of abnormalities and absence of disease or parasites is a definite must for all competing koi. Another is the necessity of brilliant colors.



Most butterfly koi enthusiasts however, maintain that these separate longfin standards are still being determined at the local koi show level. Some judges like long flowing fins for butterflies and others like short ones. Market prices however, for butterflies, give the longer and more flowing fins, the higher the grade.

Until the standards have been set, however, it is unlikely to have any certainty at all that a butterfly koi purchase is a premium grade one or not.



2017-07-10

An Introduction To KOI PONDS

Koi ponds have become a popular hobby in the world, and the reasons are clear as to why. Koi are beautiful, vibrant fish that can literally light your day. Koi come in many colors, varieties, and kinds, so it is likely that everyone in the world can find at least one type of Koi that would suit their likes. While Koi may be a welcomed beauty to your pond, they also have an interesting history attached to them.

English: Koi fish in the pond at the Gibraltar...
Koi fish in the pond at the Gibraltar Botanic Gardens. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
In Chinese culture, Koi ponds are said to being good luck to their owners. Koi ponds are used as an overall plan to fulfill their lives. Other parts of the world consider Koi ponds as a form of relaxation and serenity. In the united states, more and more people seem to find Koi ponds to be fun more then anything else. No matter what the reason you find to have a Koi pond, they are sure to brighten your life.

However, Koi keeping should not be taken lightly. Koi, like any other animal, require time and money to maintain. The majority of first time Koi owners fail because they get the idea that keeping Koi is easy in some way. Do not let this discourage you though, as educating yourself will greatly improve your chances of succeeding. 

It is important for you to learn all you can BEFORE you begin obtaining the things you need for Koi keeping. This way, you will not slip up and have to replace anything that you have already done or bought. Planning ahead will not only save your money, but it will potentially save your sanity as well.

It is important to learn the information for yourself rather then relying on other sources. People such as your product dealer and pond builder will have limited knowledge, but should not be trusted for a reliable source, as they are selling products and may be bias. Plus, once you are at home with your Koi, your product dealer or pond builder may not be available to help you in the event of a problem.

Koi Have Personality

You would not believe that Koi actually have personalities similar to other animals. They are social, and can even be trained to eat directly from their owners hands. The more time you spend with your Koi, the more you will notice each Koi has individual characteristics and traits. 

Koi have been known to live for up to 200 years at time, but generally the average lifespan of a healthy Koi is about 30 years. So if you are looking for along time pet companion, Koi may be a good choice.

Building Your Koi Habitat

Before ever buying Koi, you must create a proper habitat for them. This is where information from your pond builder and supplier will come in handy. However, you should not rely on the opinions of just one person. It may be a god idea to do research on your own, before you go to purchase the materials needed for you pond. Because of it’s popularity, an unlimited supply of resources can be found on the topic of Koi keeping. Visit your local library, fishery center, or research online. There are quite a few things needed to sustain a habitable pond.

When it comes to pond size, bigger is always better. Koi have a habit of growing rather fast, so you have to consider pond size at the same time you are considering how many Koi you are going to put it in. 

Your filtration system is extremely important. There are 2 types of filtration, mechanical and biological. Mechanical filtration relives the pond of solids such as dead algae, insects, and Koi wastes. It is important to have enough filtration to sustain the size of the pond, and the amount and size of your Koi. Biological filtration causes a nitrogen cycle, which is what removes dissolved wastes from your pond. Without biological filtration, built up waste will turn into ammonia and kill your Koi within just a few days. 



Besides the technical aspects of your pond, you will also have the ability to create a visually appealing area as well. Waterfalls, fountains, and other water features will not only add a visual show to your pond, but it will also create movement and sound. A variety of plants and flowers are also available for your pond.



The Basics of Keeping KOI

Koi pond’s popularity are on the rise, and the reasons are obvious. Who would not want living creatures as a part of their garden? However, Koi keeping should not be taken lightly. Koi, like any other animal, require time and money to maintain. The majority of first time Koi owners fail because they get the idea that keeping Koi is easy in some way. Do not let this discourage you though, as educating yourself will greatly improve your chances of succeeding. 

English: Koi fish cliche (abstract)
Koi fish cliche (abstract)
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)

It is important for you to learn all you can BEFORE you begin obtaining the things you need for Koi keeping. This way, you will not slip up and have to replace anything that you have already done or bought. Planning ahead will not only save your money, but it will potentially save your sanity as well.

It is important to learn the information for yourself rather then relying on other sources. People such as your product dealer and pond builder will have limited knowledge, but should not be trusted for a reliable source, as they are selling products, and may be bias. Plus, once you are at home with your Koi, your product dealer or pond builder may not be available to help you in the event of a problem.

Your Pond

Before ever buying Koi, you must create a proper habitat for them. This is where information from your pond builder and supplier will come in handy. However, you should not rely on the opinions of just one person. It may be a god idea to do research on your own, before you go to purchase the materials needed for you pond. Because of it’s popularity, an unlimited supply of resources can be found on the topic of Koi keeping. Visit your local library, fishery center, or research online. There are quite a few things needed to sustain a habitable pond.

When it comes to pond size, the bigger is always better. Koi have a habit of growing rather fast, so you have to consider pond size at the same time you are considering how many Koi you are going to put it in.

You filtration system is extremely important. There are 2 types of filtration, mechanical and biological. mechanical filtration relives the pond of solids such as dead algae, insects, and Koi wastes. It is important to have enough filtration to sustain the size of the pond, and the amount and size of your Koi. Biological filtration causes a nitrogen cycle, which is what removes dissolved wastes from your pond. Without biological filtration, built up waste will turn into ammonia and kill your Koi within just a few days.

Another consideration is the water quality. It is sometimes said that having Koi is literally just a side effect of having the proper water quality. To keep your Koi alive, you must have the proper knowledge on how to maintain your water quality.



Buying Koi

There are potentially thousands of different types of Koi, with about 20 different popular versions. Koi are popular because of their beautiful colors and patterns.

Your pond should be complete before you even look into buying your Koi. The size and amount of Koi you buy should be highly based on your pond. Be careful, overstocking will cause problems right away with you pond, potentially killing many of the Koi you purchase, causing you to loose time and money.

Most fish owners understand that most fish will only grow to the size of their enclosure. Koi, unlike other fish, will grow until they are the size of their specific type. You must be able to accommodate the amount of fish you purchase in the future.